NSR - National Scouting Report

Careers with NSR

NSR Scout

We want the best and expect the best. NSR licensees and scouts are dedicated professionals trained in the unique and specialized science of athletic scouting and in the sometimes hard-core, but always, detail-oriented business of college recruiting. Being a college scout may sound easy, but it is not. To be a part of our team, a person has to be on top of his or her game every day. Our scouts must be aware of, and respond to, the opportunities which could present themselves anywhere, anytime. Successful NSR scouts wear many hats.


We work hard at being the best

It is work, plain and simple, but scouting and providing service to young people and their families is rewarding, exciting and challenging. We change lives for the better. Doing so requires a one-prospect-at-a-time mentality. Why? Each "NSR athlete" is worthy of our full attention and assistance. If we do not believe in an athlete, we do not enroll them. We want to enroll prospects who have demonstrated a sense of responsibility toward their academics, their peers, their teachers, their community and their family. We will enroll hard-working, good athletes with solid grades, excellent character and supportive families before we take on a prospect who has excellent athletic talent, but whose grades are marginal, attitude is bad and whose parents are difficult to work with. Finding the right prospects, the ones who meet our standards, is not always easy, but when you do, it is worth the hard work and effort to find and enroll them. In truth, you will probably not become a millionaire scouting for NSR, but if you follow our training and have a good work ethic, you can succeed and be fulfilled.


We only bring the best aboard

What does this mean to you? Not everyone can be an NSR scout, just like not every athlete can be an NSR prospect. We expect a great deal from the people representing our company. Getting to the top happened because our licensees and scouts have consistently found, enrolled and then presented quality, high school student-athletes to college coaches. Nothing less would have gotten us to the top. Nothing less will keep us there.


What's it like being a scout?

Like any other business, NSR requires an organized, focused approach with hard work. Clients do not simply line up and ask to be enrolled with NSR. As a scout, your role is to find and pre-qualify prospects to ensure they have the ability to play at the next level, have the desire to play at the next level, are on a good academic track and conduct themselves properly at school and in the community. There are many, many athletes who fit this model, but you must find them through on-the-ground scouting.


What makes NSR's success rate so high?

NSR Scout

First, we are very particular about the scouts we bring aboard and the prospects we enroll. Second, we are a hands-on scouting organization which is unlike most other scouting companies whose scouts typically sit in an office waiting for prospects to call them or they take rosters from large tournaments and begin cold calling potential clients. They attempt to set up multiple interviews in an area, fly in a representative who is not a legitimate scout, and try to sign as many prospects as possible before flying back to their home office. They may put you on their website, but it is highly unlikely that you will ever see these people again in person. NSR scouts live in your area or region. You will usually see them at games, matches or meets scouting other prospects and checking up on your progress. In other words, your scout is available to you for advice, to answer recruiting questions or to help you take the next step in the recruiting process with a coach or college. Your NSR scout attends local and regional tournaments and other events, and many NSR scouts visit college campuses and build personal relationships with college coaches.


Do I have to be an expert in all sports?

No, but you must have a good eye for athletic talent. It would be impossible to be an expert at every sport. Your role is to find those prospects who, like described above, have the talent and desire to play college sports, good grades and character. Then, by helping parents to put together a comprehensive profile on the prospect, and through NSR's promotional efforts, the coaches will do their own evaluations. Once a college coach recognizes the prospect as one they would like to know and pursue, it is rare that the coach will seek your assistance. However, as a professional scout, you will always be available to your clients for advice as they proceed through the recruiting process.


Will I only be looking for DI prospects?

NSR Scout

No. NSR places prospects at every level of college sports. We look for good "student-athletes" regardless of which level they eventually fit. It is important, though, to understand that in many ways Division I prospects need our help just as much as those at other levels. Many DI prospects and their parents are unable to get the word out to coaches nationally and they, like all prospects, have a difficult time getting video footage to coaches quickly -- two objectives in which NSR excels. Moreover, many of D-I prospects do not have any idea how the process works, how to decipher what coaches are saying in their letters and calls, and how to push aside the fluff and get to the meat of recruiting. NSR scouts and home office staff are experts at all these things. We are in the middle of the recruiting process 24/7/365. That said, we can never predict precisely what will make one coach stop and evaluate a particular prospect and not another who may seem equally qualified. What creates that initial connection between a coach and prospect always has been, and continues to be, elusive even for the most experienced scout or coach. But, from experience we know that if you are a qualified prospect, there is a fit for you. Some prospects find it on their first contact with a coach or their first campus visit. Others take longer and require more patience and diligence.


Will it help if I have good contacts?

Yes, contacts are good to have, but only to a point. They are good to set up introductions with coaches and prospects, but contacts don't enroll prospects for you. Parents enroll their kids as prospects, and it will be your responsibility to demonstrate how NSR can maximize their child's opportunities to be noticed, evaluated and recruited by college coaches. Yes, our programs sell themselves, but there is a plethora of misinformation floating around parents and it can be confusing to them. A domineering, controlling high school, club or travel coach can create obstacles. A family friend who may have gone through the recruiting process 15 or 20 years ago can cause confusion. They all may have good intentions, but make no mistake about it, recruiting is a specialized profession which only a few people in the country really have a grasp on. Frankly others, that is those who need to be in control or who have egos to feed, may have preconceived notions about certain colleges and the recruiting process. Their advice can start families down the wrong path which can waste a tremendous amount of time. Having played college sports does not make someone an expert. Being a high school, club or travel coach does not make someone else an expert. Being a game official does not make anyone an expert. Only when a person is a college coach or certified college scout whose job requires being constantly in tune with recruiting rules and regulations can it be said they are an expert in how recruiting works.


Are high school, travel, and club coaches difficult to work with?

Not at all. A large majority of these coaches keep their role in perspective, understand that our role is not a threat to them, and therefore they do everything possible to cooperate with families that choose to get additional help in promoting their kids to college coaches. They see that their job is to make their athletes fundamentally better and to help them, through training, teamwork and competition, to become better athletes and people. They see themselves as mentors helping kids on a journey. They know that it would be virtually impossible to promote all their aspiring athletes to college coaches. They realize that the time required to construct personal profiles with statistical records, grades and accomplishments, along with copying and distributing video footage, which all college coaches need for evaluations, would be an all-consuming endeavor when they already work 70 to 80 hours per week. No, as a scout you will discover that there are many coaches who will not only accept you as an NSR scout, but who will welcome your contributions.


Can I be successful?

Absolutely. Being an NSR scout is extremely rewarding. We can change the lives of our client-prospects, save most of our client-parents thousands upon thousands of dollars and we can help turn college teams around with the signing of one key prospect. And, because we work with prospects in all sports, we have an unlimited number of potential clients starting in the recruiting process each year. As word spreads about your success and NSR's effectiveness, your business can thrive. But, it is up to you. No one else can do it for you.